aubreylstallard:

David Hockney

(Source: dionyssos)

Georg Baselitz

Mehr ich tut ach mer willn (Barle flel wil), 2013

Oil on canvas

(Source: tndra)

And all who live in corners will come to confer life upon this image, multiplying the shades of being that characterize the corner dweller. For to great dreamers of corners and holes nothing is ever empty, the dialectics of full and empty only correspond to two geometrical non-realities. The function of inhabiting constitutes the link between full and empty. A living creature fills an empty refuge, images inhabit, and all corners are haunted.
— Gaston Bachelard, The Poetics of Space (via heteroglossia)
broken english
when my mother struggles to spell a word in english
I want to break the entire language
into little pieces
so the edges of these letters
will stop cutting her


— aysha via Diaspora Defiance
(via decolonizehistory)

likeafieldmouse:

Paolo Ventura

1. The Automaton III

2. 11:55pm

3. Before the Rain

4. The Funeral of the Anarchist

5,005 plays

alysenh:

Benny & The Jets - Elton John

infinitetext:

Krzysztof Kieslowski, Three Colors: White, 1994.

silfarione:

Marilyn Monroe photographed by Milton Greene. 1957

Probably my favorite Marilyn portrait of all time.

artmastered:

Sigmar Polke, 1971-74, Spiderman

artmastered:

Sigmar Polke, 1971-74, Spiderman

In the spring of her twenty-second year, Sumrie fell in love for the first time in her life. An intense love, a veritable tornado sweeping across the plains-flattening everything in its path, tossing things up in the air, ripping them to shreds, crushing them to bits.
— Haruki Murakami, Sputnik Sweetheart
workman:


“We are born and we die,” Bacon proclaimed, “but in between we give this purposeless existence a meaning by our drives.” Sex, food, body functions, the will to create—these all give some meaning, although varied, to human existence. Maybe this explains in part Bacon’s Triptych Inspired By T. S. Eliot’s Poem Sweeney Agonistes (1967). Bacon had been reading Eliot’s verse dramas and the famous three-part summary of the human situation: 
“That’s all the facts when you come to brass tacks: Birth, and copulation, and death.”

workman:


“We are born and we die,” Bacon proclaimed, “but in between we give this purposeless existence a meaning by our drives.” Sex, food, body functions, the will to createthese all give some meaning, although varied, to human existence. Maybe this explains in part Bacon’s Triptych Inspired By T. S. Eliot’s Poem Sweeney Agonistes (1967). Bacon had been reading Eliot’s verse dramas and the famous three-part summary of the human situation:

“That’s all the facts when you come to brass tacks:
Birth, and copulation, and death.”

(Source: ophism)

218 plays

soundfall:

David Bowie - Space Oddity

There is no aspect of our experience not molded in some way by metaphor’s almost imperceptible touch. Once you twig to metaphor’s modus operandi, you’ll find its fingerprints on absolutely everything.

Metaphorical thinking — our instinct not just for describing but for comprehending one thing in terms of another, for equating I with an other — shapes our view of the world, and is essential to how we communicate, learn, discover, and invent.

Metaphor is a way of thought long before it is a way with words.

Fascinating read on what children’s use of metaphor reveals about how the mind and the imagination work. (via explore-blog)

Amodal perception is the basis of metaphorical thought and we do this pretty much from birth…discussed by Daniel Stern in his book The Interpersonal World of the Infant (1986). Based on research by Meltzoff and Borton (79) Intermodal Matching by Human Neonates.