paintedout:

Anselm Kiefer, Aschenblume

explore-blog:

Italo Calvino was offered the 1985–1986 term of the prestigious Charles Eliot Norton Professorship of Poetry at Harvard. He died weeks before he was scheduled to deliver his lectures, but working on them, his wife recalls, was the obsession of his final months.

Calvino’s manuscripts for the lectures, in which he looks back on “the millennium of the book” and peers forward into what the future might hold for “the expressive, cognitive, and imaginative possibilities” of language and literature, were his last legacy. 

Here is Calvino’s enduring wisdom from the first lecture, a magnificent meditation on lightness

I wish I never met you and I wish you never left.
You taste like a river in June.
Arkaye Kierulf, “Spaces” (via petrichour)
I long ago came to the conclusion that even if I could put down accurately the thing I saw and enjoyed, it would not give the observer the kind of feeling it gave me. I had to create an equivalent for what I felt about what I was looking at—not copy it.
Georgia O’Keeffe (via huariqueje)

cinoh:

nyctaeusJames Nizam, ‘Anteroom’, 2012, Commissioned by Louis Vuitton

Your memory is made of light, of smoke, of a still pond!
Beyond your eyes, farther on, the evenings were blazing.
Dry autumn leaves revolved in your soul.
— Pablo Neruda, from “I Remember You as You Were,” The Ecco Anthology of International Poetry (Ecco, 2010)

(Source: metaphorformetaphor)

nomade-dans-lherbe:

metzkers:

Marianne Dages - Equivalents - Gelatin silver prints, 2014

(Source: huldrapress)

I sat on a gray stone bench
ringed with the ingenue faces
of pink and white impatiens
and placed my grief
in the mouth of language,
the only thing that would grieve with me.
Lisel Mueller,When I Am Asked” (via mitochondria)
We suffer from a repression of the sublime.
— Roberto Assagioli, Psychosynthesis (via proustitute)

(Source: 1109-83)

julianminima:

Alexander Wolff - Untitled, 2011 - Fabric dye on canvas -147,5 x 109 cm

colinquinn:

Drawing in the Corner, 1971

(Source: blowjohn)

Of course, the result isn’t the point… The point is the longing.

Desire can’t be sated, because if it is, the longing disappears and then we’ve failed, because desire is the state we seek…

The worst thing of all would be if we actually arrived at perfect, because if we did, we would extinguish the very thing that drives us.

We want the wanting.

Seth Godin on desire, the paradox of which Rebecca Solnit explored beautifully. Reminiscent of Carl Sagan’s point about science and spirituality

Or, as Andy Warhol wrote in his meditations on sex and love, “The most exciting thing is not-doing-it. If you fall in love with someone and never do it, it’s much more exciting.”

(via explore-blog)
I love you. I wish we were real.
Anne Sexton, from A Self-Portrait in Letters (via victoriajoan)